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Organic Agriculture

 
 
 
 

Ecology - Restoration of the Water Table

 
 
Rainwater coming from the balconies of the houses and from the nearby squares is conducted, via an appropriately inclined gutter network, to existing natural sinkholes. In this way, it enriches the soil and prevents salination.

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Water coming from inclined plots of land is stopped by apposite structures that block its flow, stop possible runoff, retain the land, and allow excess water to pass slowly while the rest filters into the subsoil.

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From the beginning of fall until late spring, the land remains unmowed and unploughed precisely to protect the soil and prevent it from washing away. During the winter the grass is cut and left as mulch; this protects the soil and furnishes organic material that, together with organic manure, compost, cinders from the farm, and green manure left by leguminosae, constitutes our fundamental fertilizer.

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Leguminosae are important because, in addition to leaving a large amount of organic material, they absorb nitrogen from the air, retain it in their roots where microorganisms transform it into organic material, and then return it once again to the soil. When the land is ploughed, this nitrogen is eventually delivered to tree roots and thus has a very long-lasting effect.